↠´ Городские и деревенские ä Download by ✓ Sofia Khvoshchinskaya

↠´ Городские и деревенские ä Download by ✓ Sofia Khvoshchinskaya via my blog And what kind of illnesses do we have here in the country All good for nothing we don t have therefined illnesses here In town, if you look around, well, there they do have them Why does Nastasya Ivanovna, a widow, feel so inferior to the upper classes Just how does her teenage daughter go from vexing her widowed mother to helping her find her bite The wit is in young Olenka s reactions to the snobbery around her That she perceives Erast Sergeyevich Ovcharov as ridiculous and a hassle, that she resents giving up her room for her sanctimonious relative Anna, unimpressed by her status and holiness which to be fair, would annoy anyone is just what enlivens this novel I m staying out of it I m staying out of it, Anna Ilinishna interrupted her, waving her hands Do as you see fit It s in my nature to prevent evil that s all Shocked a man is staying in the unfi An Unsung Gem Of Nineteenth Century Russian Literature,City Folk And Country Folk Is A Seemingly Gentle Yet Devastating Satire Of Russia S Aristocratic And Pseudo Intellectual Elites In The S Translated Into English For The First Time, The Novel Weaves An Engaging Tale Of Manipulation, Infatuation, And Female Assertiveness That Takes Place One Year After The Liberation Of The Empire S Serfs Upending Russian Literary Clich S Of Female Passivity And Rural Gentry Benightedness, Sofia Khvoshchinskaya Centers Her Story On A Commonsense, Hardworking Noblewoman And Her Self Assured Daughter Living On Their Small Rural Estate The Antithesis Of The Thoughtful, Intellectual, And Self Denying Young Heroines Created By Khvoshchinskaya S Male Peers, Especially Ivan Turgenev, Seventeen Year Old Olenka Ultimately Helps Her Mother Overcome A Sense Of Duty To Her Betters And Leads The Two To Triumph Over The Urbanites Financial, Amorous, And Matrimonial Machinations Sofia Khvoshchinskaya And Her Writer Sisters Closely Mirror Britain S Bront S, Yet Khvoshchinskaya S Work Contains Of Jane Austen S Wit And Social Repartee, As Well An Intellectual Engagement Reminiscent Of Elizabeth Gaskell S Condition Of England Novels Written By A Woman Under A Male Pseudonym, This Brilliant And Entertaining Exploration Of Gender Dynamics On A Post Emancipation Russian Estate Offers A Fresh And Necessary Point Of Comparison With The Better Known Classics Of Nineteenth Century World Literature A while ago I was calling Turgenev the Russian Jane Austen now I ve discovered that the country has its own Bronte Sisters Like the British writers, the Khvoshchinskaya sisters were poor but educated gentlewomen writing under male pseudonyms in the mid 19th C But while they have similar biographies, middle sister Sofia s style is less gothic romance andsocial comedy Setting her book in the countryside during the summer after the serfs were emancipated, she uses female heroes and villains with a few men thrown in to examine the peculiar differences between the flaky layers of the upper crust And I do mean flaky Maybe Sofia is the female Turgenev or the real Russian Austen Her mother and daughter heroines suffer no traged Delightful and interesting Definitely a view you don t get from much other Russian literature Skewers the effete intellectual class, and those hanging on to aristocratic status by the coat tails Khvoshchinskaya and her sister Nadezhda were professional authors there was onewriting sister who did not produce a large body of work However, they wrote under pseudonyms because they were part of an impoverished noble family and it was unsuitable for women to write for the public They lived in the provinces, although they visited Moscow occasionally and Sofia had received an education in that city, studying several languages.
The action is set at a pivotal point in Russian history The serfs have just been freed, and both landowners and serfs are working out what that means Three visito via my blog And what kind of illnesses do we have here in the country All good for nothing we don t have therefined illnesses here In town, if you look around, well, there they do have them Why does Nastasya Ivanovna, a widow, feel so inferior to the upper classes Just how does her teenage daughter go from vexing her widowed mother to helping her find her bite The wit is in young Olenka s reactions to the snobbery around her That she perceives Erast Sergeyevich Ovcharov as ridiculous and a hassle, that she resents giving up her room for her sanctimonious relative Anna, unimpressed by her status and holiness which to be fair, would annoy anyone is just what enlivens this novel I m staying out of it I m staying out of it, Anna Ilinishna interrupted her, waving her hands Do as you see fit It s in my nature to prevent evil that s all Shocked a man is staying in the unfi My review My review Seeof my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsA lovely comedy of class, manners and snobbery, I think City Folk And Country Folk should appeal to Jane Austen fans the world over Khvoshchinskaya s writing, especially her dialogue, is wonderfully modern in style, sharp and vivacious, and her wickedly well observed characters are tremendous fun to spend time with I liked that while the novel doesn t shy away from depicting social problems and the upheaval in Russia at the time, Khvoshchinskaya avoids getting bogged down in depressing detail As Russian literature of the era goes, I think City Folk and Country Folk is refreshing breeze The characters particularly appealed to me because they are vivid and wonderfully alive, sometimes overstated but never grotesquely so, and women lead the narrative rather than simply being decorative adornm Nora Favorov deserves a lot of credit for doing the arduous work of exhuming this minor gem in the Russian literary cannon Although the Khvoshchniskaya sisters Praskovia, Sofia and Nadezhda were prolific and important writers, they aren t household names, not even in their native country This is partly because Sofia, who died at age 41, as I learned from the introduction to this volume, didn t want her works to be republished Most of their work appeared in periodicals, and to this day are only accessible on microfiche City Folk isn t quite as brilliant as Nadezhda s The Boarding school Girl , but it is a delightful and well crafted story that throws light on a turning point in Russian history, namely the period following the emancipation of the serfs in 1862 The story takes place on a modest but well run estate where widowed Nastasya lived in complete harm Recommended to me by Guy from His Futile Preoccupations thanks, Guy , City Folk and Country Folk is a gentle but sophisticated satire from the pen of a 19th century novelist, somewhat in the manner of Jane Austen but without the resolution of the plot with marriage.
Set in the countryside, the story centres on the visits of the nobility to the estate of Nastasya Ivanova Chulkova Unlike hersophisticated visitors who move in the best circles and feel entitled to express their disdain, Nastasya, a widow of mature years, is self sufficient due to her capable management of her estate Erast Sergeyevich Ovcharov is a pompous, pseudo intellectual hypochondriac who has neglected his much bigger estate for so long that it is now uninhabitable So he ends up lodging in Nastasya s bathhouse while he sorts out his n What a joy it has been to discover this unknown little gem of Russian literature Despite having studied Russian and having explored that country s literature for many years this one had completely passed me by, and I am so pleased to see it finally translated into English and become available to a wider audience And to discover a book by a woman writer is an added pleasure I didn t even know there were any Perhaps there arehidden away waiting to be discovered This charming novel is the story of a noblewoman, Nastasya Ivanovna, a widow, living happily with her teenage daughter Olenka on their estate in provincial Russia, one year after the liberation of the serfs She s a pragmatic woman with a common sense attitude to life, but t A very amusing book, really liked the depiction of Ovcharov, a man who flatters himself as having progressive views but who is actually elitist and sexist and rather insignificant The most admirable character to my mind is Olenka, who even if she does not care for literature is spirited, sees right through other people s hypocrisy, and laughs a great deal I hope she ended up finding a good match A good snapshot of a pivotal period in Russian history the emancipation of the serfs Top notch translation.
This satire of nineteenth century Russian manners and social hierarchies centres around the rural estate of widow Natasya Ivanova Chulkova and her daughter Olenka who work hard to maintain their home and their lives in relative comfort But as rural figures with modest property they are subjected to the metropolitan snobbery and disdain of two unwelcome guests The first is Anna, a demanding cousin with her self righteous religious preoccupation who goes out of her way to undermine and harry Natasya with demands and accusations There is also Erast Sergeyevich Ovcharov the self absorbed former neighbour who rents their bathhouse for the sake of his health.
Natasya Ivanova is troubled by her sense of duty to her neighbours and perceived social betters, even against her better judgement She struggles to meet the needs of her guests and the superior att A while ago I was calling Turgenev the Russian Jane Austen now I ve discovered that the country has its own Bronte Sisters Like the British writers, the Khvoshchinskaya sisters were poor but educated gentlewomen writing under male pseudonyms in the mid 19th C But while they have similar biographies, middle sister Sofia s style is less gothic romance andsocial comedy Setting her book in the countryside during the summer after the serfs were emancipated, she uses female heroes and villains with a few men thrown in to examine the peculiar differences between the flaky layers of the upper crust And I do mean flaky Maybe Sofia is the female Turgenev or the real Russian Austen Her mother and daughter heroines suffer no traged

Categories ferries 0 comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *