Ì Knees up Mother Earth (Brentford Trilogy) ã Download by Ì Robert Rankin

Ì Knees up Mother Earth (Brentford Trilogy) ã Download by Ì Robert Rankin A farcical underdog sporting novel with time travellers, demons and assorted mystical fantasy elements.
Have you ever read such a beast? I just finished Knees Up Mother Earth, and whilst I appreciated the craft of the author and the novelty of the concept, including footnoting which I've never seen in a work of fiction before, this book did not really do it for me.


Of the main characters, Jim the gambler and Neville the barmen were sympathetic, caught as they were in circumstances way beyond their imaginations, and way beyond their control.
There were times of suspense, and once the basic complication was established by the author, Rankin, there was no question of me being anything other than seriously intent on finding out how it would ultimately be resolved.


At times the narrati Top quality toot!

Fans of the author will love and those unaccustomed to Rankin's drawl may be confused and slightly scared by his style.
But so worth it!

I would rec Rankin to anyone.
Another fine book, 7th in the Brentford Trilogy.
Hard to explain, but in the simplest of terms:

A Great and Ancient Evil lurks beneath the turf of the Brentford football pitch.
.
.
and someone wants to let it out.
But before they can they must face the lads of Brentford on and off the field in battle.


This tale borders on the epic, and features most of the cast of the other books in the trilogy plus some of the stars of the books that are fictional in the universe of the trilogy.
An apocalypse brings out the best of the reluctant heroes of Brentford against unspeakable darkness and tentacle waving horror.


If it sounds interesting, read the rest of the series first, or many of the references may confuse the unprepared.
Pooley and O'Malley, of The Flying Swan Pub, must do all they can to save Brentford's football grounds from being demolished.
And that may just mean coaching the local team into winning it all.
That is, unless the ancient evil which hides in Brentford decides to have some fun too.
A farcical underdog sporting novel with time travellers, demons and assorted mystical fantasy elements.
Have you ever read such a beast? I just finished Knees Up Mother Earth, and whilst I appreciated the craft of the author and the novelty of the concept, including footnoting which I've never seen in a work of fiction before, this book did not really do it for me.


Of the main characters, Jim the gambler and Neville the barmen were sympathetic, caught as they were in circumstances way beyond their imaginations, and way beyond their control.
There were times of suspense, and once the basic complication was established by the author, Rankin, there was no question of me being anything other than seriously intent on finding out how it would ultimately be resolved.


At times the narrati Top quality toot!

Fans of the author will love and those unaccustomed to Rankin's drawl may be confused and slightly scared by his style.
But so worth it!

I would rec Rankin to anyone.
Another fine book, 7th in the Brentford Trilogy.
Hard to explain, but in the simplest of terms:

A Great and Ancient Evil lurks beneath the turf of the Brentford football pitch.
.
.
and someone wants to let it out.
But before they can they must face the lads of Brentford on and off the field in battle.


This tale borders on the epic, and features most of the cast of the other books in the trilogy plus some of the stars of the books that are fictional in the universe of the trilogy.
An apocalypse brings out the best of the reluctant heroes of Brentford against unspeakable darkness and tentacle waving horror.


If it sounds interesting, read the rest of the series first, or many of the references may confuse the unprepared.
Pooley and O'Malley, of The Flying Swan Pub, must do all they can to save Brentford's football grounds from being demolished.
And that may just mean coaching the local team into winning it all.
That is, unless the ancient evil which hides in Brentford decides to have some fun too.
So, book seven in the Brentford trilogy eh? What Rankin does with Knees Up is very clever.
He uses the same characters, the same plot (Brentonians to stop Armageddon) and a lot of the same gags that are present in many of the previous books.
There's certainly a whole load of deja vu.
.
.
and it's all good.
The scenario of football is cleverly woven in to the Brentford mythology and creates a raft of new options for Rankin's masterful use of humour, running gags, insightful use of language and even some suspense.
Rankin clearly enjoyed writing this book.
Knees up is a slow starter but builds up well to an enjoyable conclusion.
It's a tad too long as well, but certainly recommended.
I read the first four books in Ian Rankin's Brentford Trilogy ( yes I know! ) as the books came out in the nineteen eighties and thought them an absolute riot.
Such an unique brand of comic Science Fiction and Fantasy full of invention, clever ideas and satirical comment on celebrities, technology and everyday life.
And then there is the witty repartee and funny wordplay which make me question, does this author live in the real world or some similar but slightly skewed reality? I remember that there was nothing quite like it that I had ever come across before based in the real world here in a London suburb of all places, one that was so familiar and yet ever so slightly twisted.
Time moves on and I found this the seventh novel in the Brentford Trilogy ( yes I know! ) in a local charity shop and immediately bought it without any cause for consideration, Knees Up Mother Brown Cockney Classic YouTube Knees Up Mother Brown Knees Up Mother Brown Under The Table You Must Go Ee Aye, Ee Aye, Ee Aye Oh If I Catch You Bending I Ll Saw Your Legs Right Off Knees Up, Knees Up Never Get The Breeze UpKnees Up Mother Brown Cockney Knees Up On Knees Up Mother Brown Cockney Knees Up On Chas S Piano Knees Up, Mother De Mike Gibbs SurMusicDcouvrez Knees Up, Mother De Mike Gibbs SurMusic Coutez De La Musique En Streaming Sans Publicit Ou Achetez Des CDs Et MP Maintenant SurKnees Up Mother Brown Dance Kids Songs Listen To Our Knees Up Mother Brown Video And Sing Along With The Kids KNEES UP MOTHER BROWN SONG There Came A Girl From France Who Didn T Know How To Dance The Only Thing That She Could DoGert And Daisy Knees Up Mother Brown Lyrics Knees Up Mother Brown Is A Song That Dates Back To At Leastand The End Of World War I, However It Wasn T Published UntilAfter Publication The Song Became Popular In Cockney Culture Knees Up Mother Brown Wikipediaknees Up Mother Brown Chords By Misc Traditional Knees Up Mother Brown Guitar Chords And Lyrics By Misc Traditional Play Knees Up Mother Brown Tabs Using Our Free Guide Guitar And Piano Chords By Neatchords Knees Up Mother Brown Party Dance YouTube Knees Up Mother Brown Party Dance Tony Evans His Orchestra Big Ben Chimes Tema International Ltd Released OnMusic Publisher Mark Tyme Music Auto Generated By YouTube KNEES UP MOTHER BROWN CHORDS By Misc I Have Tabbed Two Versions Of This Song So You Can Choose Which Version Suits The Occasion In Which You Are Playing Sing Along Version VerseC F Knees Up Mother Brown Knees Up Mother Brown G Under The Table You Must Go Ee Aye Ee Aye Ee Aye Oh C F And If I Catch You Bending I Ll Saw Your Knees Right Off G Knees Up Knees Up Never Get The Breeze Up C Knees Up Mother Brown VerseC F G Oh My After being very disappointed by the previous book, "Sex and Drugs and Sausage Rolls.
" I really enjoyed this one much more.
Everything is goofy, and weird and nonsensical.
The only thing I wished there was more of, I wish the time travel had happened earlier.
It was fun, but I was waiting for it to happen for much of the book.
Mr Rankin manages, as usual, to conjur the most bizarre ideas and still make them sound plausible! The darkness is balanced well by the comedy provided by human frailty and the whole thing is, well, farfetched fiction.
Thoroughly enjoyable.
Brentford to save the world.
.
.


.
.
.
By winning the FA Cup.
Don't worry if you don't follow football.
No novel with Jim Pooley as the charismatic manager and John Omally as his PA can be that true to the game.



I read the first four books in Ian Rankin's Brentford Trilogy ( yes I know! ) as the books came out in the nineteen eighties and thought them an absolute riot.
Such an unique brand of comic Science Fiction and Fantasy full of invention, clever ideas and satirical comment on celebrities, technology and everyday life.
And then there is the witty repartee and funny wordplay which make me question, does this author live in the real world or some similar but slightly skewed reality? I remember that there was nothing quite like it that I had ever come across before based in the real world here in a London suburb of all places, one that was so familiar and yet ever so slightly twisted.
Time moves on and I found this the seventh novel in the Brentford Trilogy ( yes I know! ) in a local charity shop and immediately bought it without any cause for consideration, So, book seven in the Brentford trilogy eh? What Rankin does with Knees Up is very clever.
He uses the same characters, the same plot (Brentonians to stop Armageddon) and a lot of the same gags that are present in many of the previous books.
There's certainly a whole load of deja vu.
.
.
and it's all good.
The scenario of football is cleverly woven in to the Brentford mythology and creates a raft of new options for Rankin's masterful use of humour, running gags, insightful use of language and even some suspense.
Rankin clearly enjoyed writing this book.
Knees up is a slow starter but builds up well to an enjoyable conclusion.
It's a tad too long as well, but certainly recommended.
After being very disappointed by the previous book, "Sex and Drugs and Sausage Rolls.
" I really enjoyed this one much more.
Everything is goofy, and weird and nonsensical.
The only thing I wished there was more of, I wish the time travel had happened earlier.
It was fun, but I was waiting for it to happen for much of the book.
Mr Rankin manages, as usual, to conjur the most bizarre ideas and still make them sound plausible! The darkness is balanced well by the comedy provided by human frailty and the whole thing is, well, farfetched fiction.
Thoroughly enjoyable.
Brentford to save the world.
.
.


.
.
.
By winning the FA Cup.
Don't worry if you don't follow football.
No novel with Jim Pooley as the charismatic manager and John Omally as his PA can be that true to the game.

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