[Zane Grey] Ï Riders of the Purple Sage [domestic-science PDF] Read Online ↠´ ar1web.co

[Zane Grey] Ï Riders of the Purple Sage [domestic-science PDF] Read Online ↠´ Reading Zane Grey s 1912 Riders of the Purple Sage is a little bit disconcerting.
Expecting a western, and it is, I also got an illustration of religious intolerance and prejudice Set in Utah in the 1870s, the local political and economic powers that be are Mormon and everyone else is not Mormon Throwing around some big fish in a little pond clout, the local uber Mormons make trouble for our damsel in distress and the archetypal clad in black loner gunman Told a little differently and this is a sensitive and revealing character study of group dynamics with organized religion as a change agent Told as it is and it devolves into a melodramatic soap opera I am reminded of Mark Twain s funny descriptions of Brigham Young s household shenanigans in Roughing It.
And that leads to the second observation Akin to Jo Zane Grey s Riders of the Purple Sage is probably one of the most famous westerns ever written, but, despite its popularity since it was first published in 1912, the book may not hold as significant a place in the Canon of the American West for the simple reason that, until 2005, many people had never actually read the book that Grey wrote.
When it was first published, as a serial in Field Stream magazine, the editors had trimmed much of the original manuscript When it was ultimately re published in book form, much of the trimmed material never made it back Not only that, but much of the book was actually re written by the publisher, ostensibly to be palatable and inoffensive to gentle readers One could argue that the editors and publishers were simply improving upon Grey s tendency for purple prose and many people did, apparently , but essentially wh There are hundreds of novels written in the genre of American Westerns , most of them written in the first half of the 20th century Riders of the Purple Sage may be the best of the group Many people will consider it dated and sterotypical, but Zane Grey was a good writer and he captures with his words the stark beauty of the land and the essence of life in this ever changing landscape It s worth reading from the historical aspect, and it has a romantic touch as well.
Review revised Nov 2017.
Summary Sage sage sage sage, sage sage Mormon sage Purple sage sage sage and Gentiles, sage sage sage sage and sage Sage Sage sage sage sage riders sage sage Sage sage if sage sage thunder Sage sage sage sage sage sage sage Mormons sage sage sage sage, sage sage shot, sage sage sage sage And sage sage.
There were some other words and stuff, but really this book is about sage Mormons, Gentiles, and some other things are mentioned, but the focus is on the sage The color of the sage, the things in the sage, the way the sage looks, the way the sage feels, the sage the sage the sage I took to counting the amounts of times the word sage was used237This isn t a big book Do the math That s a lot of freaking uses of the word sage Sometimes Grey would get clever and hyphenate words sage slope, sage bordered, sage riders, sage brush but that doesn t trick me It still tas Reading Zane Grey s 1912 Riders of the Purple Sage is a little bit disconcerting.
Expecting a western, and it is, I also got an illustration of religious intolerance and prejudice Set in Utah in the 1870s, the local political and economic powers that be are Mormon and everyone else is not Mormon Throwing around some big fish in a little pond clout, the local uber Mormons make trouble for our damsel in distress and the archetypal clad in black loner gunman Told a little differently and this is a sensitive and revealing character study of group dynamics with organized religion as a change agent Told as it is and it devolves into a melodramatic soap opera I am reminded of Mark Twain s funny descriptions of Brigham Young s household shenanigans in Roughing It.
And that leads to the second observation Akin to Jo Zane Grey s Riders of the Purple Sage is probably one of the most famous westerns ever written, but, despite its popularity since it was first published in 1912, the book may not hold as significant a place in the Canon of the American West for the simple reason that, until 2005, many people had never actually read the book that Grey wrote.
When it was first published, as a serial in Field Stream magazine, the editors had trimmed much of the original manuscript When it was ultimately re published in book form, much of the trimmed material never made it back Not only that, but much of the book was actually re written by the publisher, ostensibly to be palatable and inoffensive to gentle readers One could argue that the editors and publishers were simply improving upon Grey s tendency for purple prose and many people did, apparently , but essentially wh There are hundreds of novels written in the genre of American Westerns , most of them written in the first half of the 20th century Riders of the Purple Sage may be the best of the group Many people will consider it dated and sterotypical, but Zane Grey was a good writer and he captures with his words the stark beauty of the land and the essence of life in this ever changing landscape It s worth reading from the historical aspect, and it has a romantic touch as well.
Review revised Nov 2017.
Summary Sage sage sage sage, sage sage Mormon sage Purple sage sage sage and Gentiles, sage sage sage sage and sage Sage Sage sage sage sage riders sage sage Sage sage if sage sage thunder Sage sage sage sage sage sage sage Mormons sage sage sage sage, sage sage shot, sage sage sage sage And sage sage.
There were some other words and stuff, but really this book is about sage Mormons, Gentiles, and some other things are mentioned, but the focus is on the sage The color of the sage, the things in the sage, the way the sage looks, the way the sage feels, the sage the sage the sage I took to counting the amounts of times the word sage was used237This isn t a big book Do the math That s a lot of freaking uses of the word sage Sometimes Grey would get clever and hyphenate words sage slope, sage bordered, sage riders, sage brush but that doesn t trick me It still tas This isn t really a review, because the only thing I remember about this book is that I read it over fifty years ago Probably ought to read it again, I m sure it would be fun Better yet I now have two other books by Grey The Desert of Wheat and Western Union.
I picked them up a couple months ago when I visited The Country bookshop in Plainfield Vermont, just to see the place where a dear friend of mine, now passed away, had worked for many years The books were in a large bookcase outside the shop, on a covered porch, labelled Free Really FreeIt would be interesting to see what I would feel about Grey s writing style, now that I ve spent five decades reading scores of many accomplished and literary authors.
Perhaps it wouldn t stand up to that five star vague recollection Previous review A Firing OffenseNext review Ghosts of BelfastMore recent review Previou Set in 1871, published in 1912 This story is far than a western adventure, although it is surely that There are deep and tender relationships among the characters, including impressive and moving portrayals of the two women who are central to the story There are also many matchless descriptions of the magnificent western landscape But what is most powerful is the scathing denunciation of the vicious Mormon practices of control exercised against anyone who stands up against the leadership, particularly a woman If these descriptions are true, and I have no reason to believe they are not, it is a truly disgusting portrait How long did it take the Mormons to grow past that history, or do remnants still persist I am struck that the description of the Mormons in 1871 is like that of other controlling religions and cults in the past and today.
Initially Published In And The First Of Zane Grey S Many Bestsellers, This Stirring Tale Of Adventure In The High Country Established The Prototype For Western Novels Of The Twentieth Century The Plot S Focus Is A Proud Young Heroine Who S Determined To Defend Her Utah Ranch She Stands Alone Against The Villains Who Rustle And Stampede Her Cattle Until A Stranger Rides Into The Territory Notorious As The Scourge Of Mormon Transgressors, The Stranger Stays On To Assist In The Inevitable Showdown, And Romance Blooms Amid The Canyons And Cottonwoods A Classic Of American Frontier Fiction, Riders of the Purple Sage Teems With Color, Authenticity, And Thrills Lassiter is a very angry man.
His sister and only living relative, disappears from her home in Texas The only person he loves in the world Kidnapped Who knows,but the brother will search as long as it takes ,to find her Similar to The Searchers film After years on the long weary road, the gunman discovers the sister, in an unmarked lonely grave, in southern Utah.
The former cowboy seaks revenge, he has killed before, he will again.
Complications occur when he meets Jane Withersteen , a rich landowner, he begins to stop hating.
Lassiter reputation scares the areas small town.
It s controlled by a religious sect, that doesn t like nonmembers The townsmen keep trying to kill him but he s hard to eliminate.
Jane hires Lassiter to prevent her cattle and prize horses, from being stolen.
Reading a classic Western novel was a to do on my book bucket list I m not sure why because I ve never had a high opinion of TV or movie westerns After finishing Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey I can scratch classic Western off my list and add another 4 star book to the read column.
Oh yeah, there is some cheesy, over dramatic scenes in this book, particularly at the end There is the courageous too good to be true heroine, several men who want her, beautiful sunsets and numerous mentions of the beautiful purple sage, but somehow, I wouldn t change an inch of type Perhaps, its because I listened to the audiobook with a narrator who sounded like he could have lived back then or perhaps its just because this book was everything I thought a Western should be I read a large number of Zane Grey books back in the 60s and 70s and this one is a story of almost iconic proportions The gunman in black who seemingly rides in from nowhere, but here we fill in a lot of the usual blanks.
Warning The book is very well written a little dated, and florid in places My dad always said Grey could spend 2 pages describing a bush and an exciting story I think I ought to mention however that the book features a rather unflattering view of Mormons I won t make apologies or try to explain it, the book was published in 1912 It was a different time I just thought I ought to place a warning as I m sure some might be offended by some of the content of the story It s based on a time when feelings were running high and I have no idea about how Grey himself felt He was simply telling a story set in a time when there had been p



Set in 1871, published in 1912 This story is far than a western adventure, although it is surely that There are deep and tender relationships among the characters, including impressive and moving portrayals of the two women who are central to the story There are also many matchless descriptions of the magnificent western landscape But what is most powerful is the scathing denunciation of the vicious Mormon practices of control exercised against anyone who stands up against the leadership, particularly a woman If these descriptions are true, and I have no reason to believe they are not, it is a truly disgusting portrait How long did it take the Mormons to grow past that history, or do remnants still persist I am struck that the description of the Mormons in 1871 is like that of other controlling religions and cults in the past and today.
This isn t really a review, because the only thing I remember about this book is that I read it over fifty years ago Probably ought to read it again, I m sure it would be fun Better yet I now have two other books by Grey The Desert of Wheat and Western Union.
I picked them up a couple months ago when I visited The Country bookshop in Plainfield Vermont, just to see the place where a dear friend of mine, now passed away, had worked for many years The books were in a large bookcase outside the shop, on a covered porch, labelled Free Really FreeIt would be interesting to see what I would feel about Grey s writing style, now that I ve spent five decades reading scores of many accomplished and literary authors.
Perhaps it wouldn t stand up to that five star vague recollection Previous review A Firing OffenseNext review Ghosts of BelfastMore recent review Previou Lassiter is a very angry man.
His sister and only living relative, disappears from her home in Texas The only person he loves in the world Kidnapped Who knows,but the brother will search as long as it takes ,to find her Similar to The Searchers film After years on the long weary road, the gunman discovers the sister, in an unmarked lonely grave, in southern Utah.
The former cowboy seaks revenge, he has killed before, he will again.
Complications occur when he meets Jane Withersteen , a rich landowner, he begins to stop hating.
Lassiter reputation scares the areas small town.
It s controlled by a religious sect, that doesn t like nonmembers The townsmen keep trying to kill him but he s hard to eliminate.
Jane hires Lassiter to prevent her cattle and prize horses, from being stolen.
Reading a classic Western novel was a to do on my book bucket list I m not sure why because I ve never had a high opinion of TV or movie westerns After finishing Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey I can scratch classic Western off my list and add another 4 star book to the read column.
Oh yeah, there is some cheesy, over dramatic scenes in this book, particularly at the end There is the courageous too good to be true heroine, several men who want her, beautiful sunsets and numerous mentions of the beautiful purple sage, but somehow, I wouldn t change an inch of type Perhaps, its because I listened to the audiobook with a narrator who sounded like he could have lived back then or perhaps its just because this book was everything I thought a Western should be I read a large number of Zane Grey books back in the 60s and 70s and this one is a story of almost iconic proportions The gunman in black who seemingly rides in from nowhere, but here we fill in a lot of the usual blanks.
Warning The book is very well written a little dated, and florid in places My dad always said Grey could spend 2 pages describing a bush and an exciting story I think I ought to mention however that the book features a rather unflattering view of Mormons I won t make apologies or try to explain it, the book was published in 1912 It was a different time I just thought I ought to place a warning as I m sure some might be offended by some of the content of the story It s based on a time when feelings were running high and I have no idea about how Grey himself felt He was simply telling a story set in a time when there had been p

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